No you can’t go there it’s not safe!

Dargah – A burial place for a Muslim, and in this case, Sarkar Sabir Pak, a prominent Sufi saint, and his right-hand men.

Strongly advised not to go alone by my hosts, I rolled my eyes. I’m constantly being warned about the dangers of this place or that city, and I do heed most warnings. I’m realising that the warnings normally come from well-meaning people who might not have frequented those locations. The hearsay and reputation can become a bit of a mountain out of a mole hill.  (I’m writing this from a refugee camp in Palestine).


So, off we went to Dargah, albeit I had three men to accompany me, two Hindus and a Muslim. Headscarf on, I wandered about like I belonged and very quickly was invited by the drummer to sit and chat and get a happy snap with him as he played. Dervish Drummers were the traditional way to announce the call to prayer before speaker systems were invented. Whilst I am partial to a melodic call to prayer in the distance, I quite liked this approach too.


Obligatory flowers were purchased on the way in and scattered across the tomb. Singled out (not like that was hard) I was blessed and prayed for by the Imam on duty and we ate the petals of the roses as an act of sharing the blessings. On to the main Dargah, I am told that before an Indian or Pakistani Muslim completes the Hajj they must first come here. I’ve questioned my Middle Eastern Muslim mates on Sarkar Sabir Pak and they’ve never heard of him, another example of regional interpretation of ceremony, religion and law.


Here there are many women possessed by Jinn (a bad spirit, not to be confused with GIN – a very good spirit!). This place is famous for being able to cure people of this demonization. Around me women are throwing themselves about in an uncontrollable fit. All without a headscarf I notice, which to me is odd, but I guess the demon is not bothered about the rules. Other Muslims (mainly men) stand around in a circle and utter blessings, issuing commands to the demon to leave the women. (Why is it always us ladies who get possessed? *eye roll*). I can’t ask too much because to stare would invite said Jinn into my soul and we can’t have that. Much less of the fanfare of the Brazilian exorcism I witnessed. I’m either getting used to this sort of thing or the more subdued and private approach to exorcizing demons in Islam is more appealing to me. Did I just write that sentence?


Following all the cues and rituals of our Muslim chaperone, we escape unscathed. Of course. I’m beginning to see that this fear of people’s differences is a worldwide phenomenon and yes, the area was not the most desirable of location (I’ve seen worse). And apparently, it’s the red-light district by night. I’m left feeling somewhat smug that I continue to challenge the advice of my hosts, drivers and others. Honestly some of the most interesting experiences I have had  have been on the back of a warning. The Favela’s in Rio, the Souk in Tyre, the red-light district in Manila and now the Dargah in India.


Moral of the story: take advice, proceed with caution and witness amazing things because extraordinary is just outside your comfort zone.

 

Yours in Faith,

The Unlikely Pilgrim

 

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