Holy Land #1 – Jewish Extremism

Let’s get this straight. Zionism is a movement for extremist Jews from all over the world to occupy a land that isn’t necessarily rightfully theirs. Yes? I’m gonna find out.
This article is NOT an attack on Judaism or Jewish people; it is part of a series of ALL religious extremist groups. This is my perspective after spending time in the country known as Israel or Occupied Palestine, depending on who you ask.
I spent seven days on the Israel side of the green line and seven days in Palestine. I stayed with Jews, Christians and Muslims who were mostly born in the area. 

Fact Check! 

  • Pre-1948 the entire area was called Palestine. A name that dates back to the biblical term of the people who lived there: Philistines.
  • This region has been occupied for centuries by the Romans, Ottomans, Umayyad, British and others; now by the Zionists (Israel)
  • In 1948 the British Empire ‘gave’ this land to the Zionist movement, it was:
  1. Not theirs to give – kind of like Pakistan. (I’ll let you know how that trip goes). Or Australia for that matter. That’s politics for ya.
  2. Propagated with the lie that this was “A land without people for a people without land” – there were people, they’re called Palestinians. They’ve lived here for centuries and many of them still have the key to their old homes

  • Israeli (Zionist) leaders then opened the door for any person of Jewish descent to come here and have citizenship – Aliyah they call it (Google it if you want to learn more). So the majority of these people actually already have a home country. I’m confused, as a Catholic do I get automatic citizenship in the Vatican? 

Don’t be fooled with the ‘persecuted Jews needed a homeland’ bollocks either. Israel in 2017 is not populated with descendants of European holocaust survivors. It’s crammed full of Russian, American and Canadians among others from very safe and inclusive countries, all of which are happy to have them. Hence why no one gives up their original passport. 

Note: I met a Canadian woman who had been living in Jerusalem for 37 years and was just going to pick up her renewed Canadian passport. Interesting.

    • Palestinians are now trapped in their allocated section most of which is controlled by the Zionists anyway, sorry, Israeli forces. Treated as second class citizens in their homeland (because they are from here and so were their grandparents and their great great grandparents.) Subjected to difficult economic situations, limited services and many in makeshift neighbourhoods (camps) set up by the UN. 

    Note: I met a woman whose husband died because he did not have ‘permission’ to enter Jerusalem. Not cool!

      • Yes the Palestinians left their properties, in fear that they would be killed. Not just because they fancied a change. So that’s not a green light to bulldoze homes and build illegal Jewish settlements.

       Note: The Jewish settlements in the West Bank are illegal and against international law! Yet they’re still there. Why? Because Israel has all the guns, literally. They distribute the ammunition to the Palestinian Authority. What the?

        I could go on and on. Spend an hour and do some research. It’s not black and white.


              What’s happening in the Holy Land is not dissimilar to the Nazi regime in WW2 Europe in principal. Okay, there are no gas chambers. But Palestinians are fenced in to their territory like a prison; guarded day and night with less rights and freedom of movement than those with an Israeli passport. Sound familiar? This ethnicity gets this ‘badge’ while the others get another. Shall we get the tattoo gun out (too soon?). 

              Even I know what that discrimination feels like after being subject to an excessive search resulting in my human rights being violated at the hands of the arrogant and disgraceful airport security. As I watched those on an Israeli passport or notably dressed in Jewish manner waved through to a much more lenient check. What, so no Israeli is a risk to terrorism? Wow. Reverse racial profiling? Let’s talk about that later.

              The chosen ones. Really?

              Now let’s talk locals. I spoke to many Jewish people, loads in fact. I did find it difficult to talk to anyone who was actually born in Israel though. But alas they do exist.
              I had dinner at a Rabbi’s house, prayed at the Western Wall, celebrated Mimouna and participated in a Seder dinner. A Seder dinner is an annual celebration of the exodus of the Jews from being enslaved and treated like second class citizens by the Egyptians (oh the irony). I got into quite a hot debate with a Moroccan Jew (not born in Israel), an American Christian, and a Russian Jew residing in Jerusalem.(I know sounds like a joke, a Jew, Russian and a Christian walk into a bar). They continued to throw scripture at me and the old line – the Jews were promised this land from God. Ah, okay, so God said you could break the commandments and steal, murder and dishonour your neighbour. Why didn’t you say so? Jesus said that he died for my sins so can I just go on a rampage then…

              I did have a lengthy conversation with a few Israeli-born men. When I challenged them on their thoughts about the Palestinian people and whether they should be treated with such contempt, they all sung from the same hymn sheet like brainwashed robots. They said that it is written that this land would be returned to the Jewish people. Also that God was protecting the Jewish people to enable this prophecy to come true. Okay great. I thought he protected everyone and that wasn’t the question that I asked.


              Don’t get me wrong. I understand that thousands of years ago the land of Israel existed and was a Jewish centre.But that’s the history of the world. Do we want to erase centuries of conquests and reclaim ancient lands? If that’s the case the whole planet has a refugee problem, from Australia, to Europe, South America, the US and beyond.


              Anyhoo I’m off to read Ezekiel; apparently it’s all in there. Stay tuned, I intend on getting to the bottom of this.
              Yours ‘very confused’ in faith,

              The Unlikely Pilgrim

              No you can’t go there it’s not safe!

              Dargah – A burial place for a Muslim, and in this case, Sarkar Sabir Pak, a prominent Sufi saint, and his right-hand men.

              Strongly advised not to go alone by my hosts, I rolled my eyes. I’m constantly being warned about the dangers of this place or that city, and I do heed most warnings. I’m realising that the warnings normally come from well-meaning people who might not have frequented those locations. The hearsay and reputation can become a bit of a mountain out of a mole hill.  (I’m writing this from a refugee camp in Palestine).


              So, off we went to Dargah, albeit I had three men to accompany me, two Hindus and a Muslim. Headscarf on, I wandered about like I belonged and very quickly was invited by the drummer to sit and chat and get a happy snap with him as he played. Dervish Drummers were the traditional way to announce the call to prayer before speaker systems were invented. Whilst I am partial to a melodic call to prayer in the distance, I quite liked this approach too.


              Obligatory flowers were purchased on the way in and scattered across the tomb. Singled out (not like that was hard) I was blessed and prayed for by the Imam on duty and we ate the petals of the roses as an act of sharing the blessings. On to the main Dargah, I am told that before an Indian or Pakistani Muslim completes the Hajj they must first come here. I’ve questioned my Middle Eastern Muslim mates on Sarkar Sabir Pak and they’ve never heard of him, another example of regional interpretation of ceremony, religion and law.


              Here there are many women possessed by Jinn (a bad spirit, not to be confused with GIN – a very good spirit!). This place is famous for being able to cure people of this demonization. Around me women are throwing themselves about in an uncontrollable fit. All without a headscarf I notice, which to me is odd, but I guess the demon is not bothered about the rules. Other Muslims (mainly men) stand around in a circle and utter blessings, issuing commands to the demon to leave the women. (Why is it always us ladies who get possessed? *eye roll*). I can’t ask too much because to stare would invite said Jinn into my soul and we can’t have that. Much less of the fanfare of the Brazilian exorcism I witnessed. I’m either getting used to this sort of thing or the more subdued and private approach to exorcizing demons in Islam is more appealing to me. Did I just write that sentence?


              Following all the cues and rituals of our Muslim chaperone, we escape unscathed. Of course. I’m beginning to see that this fear of people’s differences is a worldwide phenomenon and yes, the area was not the most desirable of location (I’ve seen worse). And apparently, it’s the red-light district by night. I’m left feeling somewhat smug that I continue to challenge the advice of my hosts, drivers and others. Honestly some of the most interesting experiences I have had  have been on the back of a warning. The Favela’s in Rio, the Souk in Tyre, the red-light district in Manila and now the Dargah in India.


              Moral of the story: take advice, proceed with caution and witness amazing things because extraordinary is just outside your comfort zone.

               

              Yours in Faith,

              The Unlikely Pilgrim

               

              Guru? What’s a Guru?

              Living Interfaith Community – now that catches my attention.

              I stumbled across this place in my quest for all things faith in India and I can hardly begin to describe what I found here. Harmony, tolerance, unity and personally inner peace and calm.


              Gobind Sadan was started by Baba Virsa Singh over 30 years ago, an incredible man of God who dreamt of building a place where all men and women of all faiths can come, worship and live together in harmony. His message is simple: work hard, look after others and love God. Your way! Here they hold the Havan (sacred fire) in high regard. Around the clock three Havans are tended to and prayed upon by the occupants and passing pilgrims who volunteer.

               I dutifully sat by this fire and chanted in Sanskrit in the morning, recited the Jaap Sahib in the afternoon and sat in solitude in the evening whilst wishing well on the world and all the people in it. Trying not to forget to pour the ghee and cleanse the new wood so that no ants are harmed (after all it’s a vegetarian fire).


              For three days I immersed myself in the culture of Gobin Sadan. This involved quite a tight schedule that seemed to keep me busy but not bored and not tired. Up at dawn for the first round of prayers (ok so I slept through that the first day), followed by prayers and prasad at the Havan at  8:00am. Then it was over to the Gurdwara to hear the recitation of the Guru Granth Sahib and chanting by the main Havan as the Guru – Babaji made offerings to God. The words were repeated over and over in unison (tan tan a baba siri chand sahib) with the other followers. It was such a beautiful sound and there was a feeling of being in a trance. I could have sat for hours, watching the flames flicker and dance with each other along with the swaying of the Chaur Sahib (second nature after such a short time).


              Quick brekky and 10:00am snuck up on me. Time to recite the Jaap Sahib – a Sikh morning prayer; complicated at first with Hindi Sanskrit and Arabic. This is sung, the leader first, then us in chorus after him. Then it was rest time and reflection. Back to the Havan for midday prayers, lunch, rest unless you’re on fire duty – I was. Then a round table reading of a passage of the Guru Granth Sahib and reflection of what those words meant to us. Off to Jesus’ place to pray at 6:00pm and the cycle continues into the night and actually starts again at 2:00am.


              The Guru – of which I would say there was two, Mary an incredible woman of the lord. Check out her story below; and Babaji, who I was lucky enough to have an audience with…twice. Of course, the first time I was feeling quite overwhelmed and wasted my opportunity to chat with such a wise and awesome man of God. Instead of going deep we discussed trivial history of the farm of which I already knew and of course the pilgrimage after being prompted as to my ‘purpose’ in life. Is it my purpose? But the second time, feeling more at ease, I just waltzed up and asked if we could have a chat and thankfully and graciously he agreed.


              So, what do you ask when you have the Guru’s attention? Well my heart is repairing from my previous relationship. Healing advice? I’m dating a Muslim. Interfaith advice? And I’m dedicating my life to spreading tolerance. Protection and wisdom? I go for the hat-trick. I asked if the soul tie ever really evaporates following the loss of a great love or if a part of your heart dies with that end? I’m serious. He ponders. I can hardly catch my breath hoping he really does have the answer, suddenly immersed with more heartache than I thought I had left. He speaks, “The heart overflowing with love is a gift from God. You are blessed to have had this person to mould and guide you for the period you had. I will ask God for healing.” (Don’t weep, don’t weep).


              The Guru continues, “In a partnership of two faiths you have the opportunity to learn and grow in tolerance and the children will know the love of God from more than one source. Should they experience negativity from their peers, society and others, they will know through the love of God and strength of their parents that they operate on a higher field than those who judge others for their faith.” Whoa!


              And finally he hits me with this,“God is always with you, I will pray for your protection but in the arms of God who is Allah, who is Shiva and who speaks to us in many forms. He will always protect you, his daughter, so be at peace.”

              WOW! How can that be so heavy yet so enlightening all at once? I feel free, I feel no fear and I feel FAITH. I offer my life into the hands of God. I will succeed, I will be safe and my longing for a family WILL happen.


              I think I found a Guru…. make that two! 

              https://youtu.be/P7XaacSD1bg  
              Yours in Faith,

              The Unlikely Pilgrim

               

              Pilgrim of the Week – Mohammed

               

              Wandering the streets of Byblos, a town that dates to the Phoenicians some 6000 years  ago, is a square with a quaint Catholic chapel on the right and a historical mosque on the left. I was eager to enter both, so I asked the gentleman at the entrance of the mosque if ladies could enter (always wise to ask in the Middle East). This was Mohammed. Pleased we had our headscarfs in hand, he welcomed us in to what I discovered later was the men’s prayer hall. Mohammed discussed Islam willingly with us. He was interested in my project and insisted on taking pictures of me in front of  where the Imam sits. Mohammed gave me a contact of his nephew in Melbourne so that I could interview him when I got back to Australia. Mohammed’s openness to us three ladies is what makes the journey to understanding and tolerance easier. Of course, in Lebanon this is exactly why they stand out, one country, one God, different pathways. Thank you Mohammed and yes, I will ring your nephew.

              Yours in Faith

              The Unlikely Pilgrim

              Lebanon – A history book of faith

              Lebanon! What an incredible country. My first few days in Beirut was spent enjoying the famous Lebanese hospitality, exploring the historical sites and eating! I’m beginning to think this project should be called ‘The Gluttonous Pilgrim’. I’m enjoying the food and people just as much as the religious contexts that I find in every destination. There goes the yoga body! It is a Middle Eastern country with a European vibe. They say it is the Paris of the east. Walking through downtown Beirut, I can see why.

              History is everywhere you turn in Lebanon, from the Garden of Forgiveness in Beirut sandwiched between the Mohammad Al-Amin Mosque and the St George Maronite Church ruins that are centuries old. The history is also evident at the sites  in Jbeil (also known as Byblos) and Baalbek – the place of one of the world’s largest Roman ruins.

              Down in the valley near the Syrian border is Baalbek, an almighty display of Roman grandeur, layers upon layers of civilisations, religion and faith threaded through each one. Here the Romans built temples dedicate to Venus – God of Love, Bacchus – God of Wine and Jupiter -God of Sky. A Triad of Gods at that time. Three – there’s that number again, so prevalent in so many faiths. I’ll be investigating that further. The temple of Bacchus  was recently restored and is host to opera festivals. The expansive interior was once used for  ceremony: a reminder of the rituals of the day. Then when the Byzantines moved in the temples were converted to cathedrals and churches for prayer and finally the Omayadd Empire converted sites to mosques and citadels.

              Byblos and Anjar are also steeped in religious history. Wherever ruins are found, whether they be theatres, houses, stables, stores or fortresses, always close by is the house of worship, the temples of Gods and Goddesses, cathedrals or mosques. In Anjar there is evidence of a private mosque for the prince who came to Lebanon during the Omayyad era, the first Islamic rulers. Even in Byblos that dates back six thousand years to the Phoenicians, Temples for the God of War, the God of Love and Dance, among others.

               

              If you want to explore the historical sites in Lebanon I highly recommend it. I was blown away by the construction and intricate details in the stone and marble buildings here. Our guide Natasha, an archaeologist, brought the stories to life through her passion for the past and jovial commentary on the quality of restoration works.

              http://www.nakhal.com/

              In modern times religion is highly debated; part of the reason I’m on this trip is to understand organised religions’ role in this modern world. One thing that has struck me about my trip to Lebanon is that all religions are here to stay. The sustainability of faith through war, evolution, progress and everything else the world throws at us is undeniable. Religion and faith survives. It is the centre of our ancestry and it shapes our future, whether we like it or not.

              One theme that appeared at every site was cemented when I visited Tyre in the south where the necropolis of hundreds of people was discovered. And that is the acceptance of different religions is the centre of Lebanon’s culture. In Tyre, there is a Christian cemetery next door to a Muslim burial site, separated by a dividing wall. The echo of the call to prayer sounds, as the Maronite Church bell’s chime. My Muslim driver holds my hand through the ice so I can reach the hermitage of St Charbel to pray. The doors are open to their neighbours in Palestine and Syria, regardless of religion. Sure that situation brings its challenges for society and resources but the ‘honour thy neighbour’ principal is there. Pope John Paul II said, “Lebanon is more than a country. It is a message of freedom and an example of pluralism for the East and West”. I think he’s right .

              Yours in Faith,

              The Unlikely Pilgrim

              Not Encouraged, Not Forbidden – Religion in China

              I’m left feeling a little confused. I’ve travelled the north and south of China and chatted to anyone who would listen and I’ve found three conflicting arguments.

              1. Yes, of course you can practice religion in China. It’s just not encouraged. And if you are a communist party member you can’t.
              2. No. You are not allowed to practice religion in China unless you have a foreign passport.
              3. You can practice religion but a lot of Chinese people don’t really believe; they just go for luck. Like the temple at New Year. What?


              There is a rich history of diverse religion in China. I have explored mosques, churches, temples and synagogues. But if I’m honest most were somewhat lacking in that feeling of closeness to God that I usually find in places of worship. For the most part they were beautiful buildings filled with people. But they were tourists, not faithfuls. Historical buildings to be admired for their architecture, not houses of God. Restored and respected, but not revered. Some of which you can’t even enter. Empty, dormant, just a shell of a past time gone by.

              img_6940
              In Harbin the soullessness of a gorgeous historical Russian church broke my heart. The only association with God in this incredible place was an extraordinary last supper painting at the front, where I imagine the altar lay many years ago. Not a pew in sight; a history of Harbin adorned the walls and that’s all. It was filled to the brim with Chinese tourists taking selfies and skimming past the information on the walls. It was a tick in the box sight to see whilst in town for the annual ice festival. At least that’s what it felt like. Also in Harbin I found a spectacular refurbished synagogue which is now a Jewish museum, here at least relics of the faith that should be running through the halls could be found.
              Although, the most perplexing church was the fabulous Gothic Cathedral in Shanghai. There was a Christian book store at the side but the building is a not allowed to be entered and the annex is a restaurant and function centre. The ladies in the book store selling bibles said there is no service here… ever. Odd, so no service, but come and buy a bible?
              With a population of over 1.4 billion people the 50-odd locals I spoke to in two weeks is hardly an accurate representation, but I get the feeling there is two camps. The faithful who find a way, and the others who see religion as a history lesson or something the west does, not a reality in China. Let’s ignore the fact that it’s a Buddhist nation for now and that temples filled with monks and worshippers are plentiful.


              China. It’s a strange place and the mystery of religion continues as I attended Chinese New Year celebrations in the Jina’ng Temple. To be by my side at midnight in the temple you would be rest assured faith is alive and well in this great land. A sea of thousands of heads bowed, hands in prayer, awaiting the New Year to commence. On the other hand if you walked the empty halls of churches in Beijing you’d perhaps find yourself saddened by the gaping hole of faith in such  iconic buildings.
              To me places of worship of any denomination command a certain respect. They provide a community vibe, one of inclusion, sanctuary and service.  It is with dedication and devotion that people invest time, money and effort into these places. They are holy buildings of faith where the people can gather, united and give thanks to the Lord or pray for others, the world, and for peace.


              I did find mosques, churches and temples with active services of not only expats but of real locals and was invited to tea by a Daoist leader in Harbin. In saying that, I pray more often than not in my house or my head, or when I’m walking I chat to God. So it begs the question. Is religion really reliant on a building? I know faith is not. Faith is in the heart of everyone. There is definitely faith in the hearts and minds of the Chinese. How many and how true, who knows?


              Yet, I still find myself called to pray for China. Is that arrogant of me? Is it superior to feel sad for people who are restricted in faith? I claim to be all accepting but to be hidden or confused about whether or not you can choose and practice a faith whichever you like, to me is disappointing.
              So that was China. Back to the Middle East – Lebanon here I come!
              Yours in faith,

              The Unlikely Pilgrim